Home, Chic Home.

Home, Chic Home.

In today's Tribeca, standards run as high as some of the ceilings in these large, bright units – and designers dream over the opportunity to ply their trade in such magnificent spaces.  Whether your style is dark metro sleek or romantic shabby-chic, the sky is the limit to what the right design team can do for you. 

Admittedly, living in a loft building is a lot different than living in a co-op or a set of condos.  Layout often varies drastically from unit to unit as people apply their unique tastes to the raw space.  Walking from unit to unit can feel like opening doors into different, imaginative worlds, rather than in a standard apartment building which only allows for minor variations to the same thing, and you may need to petition for months to switch from polar white to eggshell white.

Tenants and owners of loft buildings love to retain their space's lofty charm by reclaiming, and often improving on items such as exposed brick (a well-liked selling point in New York realty), exposed wooden beams, pillars, etc.  A thrifty designers can even incorporate materials reclaimed from elsewhere to amplify the look. 

Designers have also seen an upsurge in the neighborhood's well-to-do tenants requesting top-end design for their newest additions, in the form of some of the most stylized nurseries and playrooms you've ever seen.  Built-in contemporary shelving for books, unique and functional lighting installations, and even floating staircases and catwalks can be par for the course if the ceiling is high enough. 

Some of the units, even those without great heights, are not slouching when it comes to their design.  Designers relish in pairing the present, hard industrial finishes, often distressed, with soft textiles and cushy couches for an effect that is both stunning and cozy. 

How would you design your loft-space?

 

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Current Trends in Office Sublets

Current Trends in Office Sublets

In Manhattan, there are all types of startups who are just getting off the ground; tech, marketing, fashion, the arts, small brokerages, sales teams, new products, etc., etc...  Historically, we are a home to the bold - the innovators.  Unfortunately, the commercial real estate market (if you are seeking in Manhattan) isn't exactly user-friendly when it comes to startups with limited resources. 

Understandably, these young companies would rather not put such a large amount of their financial resources toward simply having a workspace.  If you feel that your company is at such a juncture where you could definitely benefit off of the convenience and prestige of a Manhattan workspace, but you feel you are not in the right place to commit to a full Manhattan lease, then you're in luck.  These days, there are plenty of other people and young companies who are finding themselves in a similar position, and as we always do in Manhattan, the market has stepped in to fill this newfound niche with various means of subleasing everything from desks to offices to entire floors from other business-owners so that you may operate in the location you want, without bearing the gravity of an actual commercial lease.

In a reaction to this market, we have also witnessed the creation of co-working spaces – basically large spaces with an office manager who takes care of maintenance and all manner of amenities while companies/individuals rent everything from a space at a desk to a large room of desks. 

Set up to attract the millennial workforce who is used to a more mobile technology, these places often offer open floorplans, armchairs and couches, and forward-thinking design. 

One such notable example of these planned co-working centers is the famed "WeWork" which operates in varied central locations across the city.  In it's design-oriented spaces, WeWork offers varied plans from a dedicated desk (starting at 575/mo. in NYC.) to your own private office, which starts at 750/mo. In NYC.  A lot of techies/entrepreneurs in their naissance tend to gravitate towards WeWork and its various competitors as an excellent starting point and a pleasant meeting place with quality amenities such as a caffeine bar, meeting rooms, use of printer/scanner/copier, chic common areas, outdoor patios, etc.

But what if you've moved up to the next level?  What if you want to manage your team in your own private space, but are still on your way to the big leagues?  Well fortunately, there are companies such as Prime Manhattan, who has been connecting businesses through private subleases for over fifteen years.  The brokers at Prime are experts when it comes to hooking up the right sublessor to the right sublessee, to make the right connection that leads to a win/win for both parties in whatever neighborhood they chose.  The company's database is limitless, and updated to the minute with any and all office sublets on the island of Manhattan so that a young business can focus on what really matters: growing their business.  

 

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New Construction in Tribeca

New Construction in Tribeca

Though the neighborhood of Tribeca is most widely-known for its stunning and spacious converted historical lofts, developers have been working to create new residential projects which will boast the same high ceilings and spacious floorplans that bring potential buyers to this neighborhood, with an ever-expanding array of luxury amenities to boot.

A unique example of newer construction is the Sterling Mason House, located at 71 Laight Street – a project that combines the restoration of a brick and terra cotta structure that once housed a tea and coffee warehouse with a brand new adjoining structure that was constructed in its mirror image.  Renowned architect Morris Adjmi (The Highline Building, The Wythe Hotel) created a blend of old and new, a meeting of the real and the ideal that pays homage both to history and progress.

The two adjoining structures that form Sterling Mason House are adjoined by a highly-visible courtyard, designed by the team of Deborah Nevins & Associates.  Designers sought to incorporate the structures' slender columns, which were integral to the original building's construction into the layout of the building's apartments, which range in size from 3,708 to 6,609 square feet.  Amenities at Sterling Mason include a private courtyard with waterfall, a private garage with 12 parking spaces, four elevators, and a building-wide water filtration system.

Another exciting new project is the residential tower at 111 Murray, developed by the Fischer Brothers and Witkoff.   The building will have a unique shape that expands as it rises, making it a new and distinctive part of the city’s skyline.

111 Murray is currently having open houses, and is slated to be complete in 2018.  When finished, the building will stand at some 800 feet, and will be the third tallest structure in Tribeca, matching the height of the famed Woolworth Building.  To match this great height, the developers have also included a 10,600 square foot open plaza that will sit adjacent to the tower and add to the appeal of the neighborhood.                               

The interiors of these 156 units were designed by David Mann, and are said to be a study in proportion, light, and scale.   Kitchens feature white oak cabinetry and the latest in top-end appliances by Wolf, Sub-Zero, and Miele.  The entire building features an elegant selection of natural stone, from its marble waterfall countertops in the kitchen, to its travertine wall feature in the majority of the master baths, as well as freestanding BluStone bathtubs placed against floor-to-ceiling windows for an unbeatable city-viewing experience.   

New residential buildings like the ones mentioned above are redefining the spectrum of luxury amenities with everything from a Turkish hammam with heated marble beds to optional private jet service.  It will be exciting to see what innovation comes next to Tribeca's new constructions and conversions, as the neighborhood continues to increase in value.

 

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